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Quercetin

Quercetin is a bioflavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, but highest levels are found in apples and onions. Like many other bioflavonoids, Quercetin has anti-oxidant, anti-artherogenic, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Quercetin is also neuroactive, with some of the same abilities as caffeine but less potent. There is a divide between the effects seen in quercetin in in vitro (cell cultured) studies and in vivo (in living) studies, with cell studies showing great results that are not that amazing in humans or animals. This is mostly due to quercetin having low oral bioavailability (low percentage of the compound is absorbed and put to use), but could also be due to in vitro studies using a form of quercetin called 'quercetin aglycone' whereas this particular form is never found in the blood, even after ingested, as it it gets changed in the liver. Many studies also note a high range of differences between people who ingest the same amount of quercetin, suggesting a large degree of variability is possible with supplementation.

Things To Know & Note

Is a Form Of Bioflavonoid
Primary Function Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory
Also Known As Apple extract, 3, 4, 5, 7-pentahydroxylflavone

How to Take Quercetin

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details

Dosages of quercetin used are in the range of 12.5 to 25mg per kg body weight, which translates to a range of 1,136-2,272mg daily consumption of quercetin when in isolation. It is suggested to supplement with other bioflavonoids such as resveratrol, genistein, or green tea catechins to increase the potency synergistically and theoretically get the benefits at a reduced level of intake. When looking for quercetin, the form of dihydrate has the apparent best bioavailability followed by glycosides, aglycone, and finally rutinoside.

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